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ALMOST EVERY HOUR OF EVERY DAY IN THE UNITED STATES, ONE YOUNG MAN WILL HEAR “YOU HAVE TESTICULAR CANCER” … THEY NEED TO HEAR “WE CAUGHT IT EARLY.”  

You can help increase their chances by sharing this information through either a public forum or one-on-one.

Testicular cancer strikes young men, usually between the ages of 15 - 39. While rare, incidence frequently becomes newsworthy when it strikes young vibrant men in the public eye. The death of a young man is a great loss for a family, community and society. This program is designed to help young men, parents, families, medical professionals and communities decrease the risk for death from testicular cancer. While the disease cannot be prevented, TC is 95% curable when caught early.

The incidence of testicular cancer is rising. In the United States, almost every hour of every day one young man will be diagnosed with TC. A recognized authority in testicular cancer risk reduction, the Sean Kimerling Testicular Cancer Foundation is dedicated to helping establish education programs to raise awareness of testicular cancer and the importance of early diagnosis and treatment.

Self-contained grassroots advocacy and communications programs are available online in downloadable formats. The resource kits include multimedia/ interactive and non-interactive presentations. Community leaders, TC survivors, health services professionals, and other activists are provided resources to deliver testicular health discussions to high school classes, work groups and other venues where appropriate. The goal is to encourage young men to take control of their own testicular health. Training materials targeting discussions with medical and health services professionals are also available. 

Testicular cancer is one of the most curable forms of cancer. The overall 5-year survival rate is approximately 95%. However, the complexity of treating the disease greatly increases and the survival rate declines as the disease progresses. Unfortunately, half of all men diagnosed with testicular cancer do not seek medical attention until after the cancer has spread to other areas of the body.

 
 
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Basic Facts on Testicular Cancer

  • While rare, it is the leading cancer in men between the ages of 15 – 39

  • It is highly curable when caught early

  • The incidence is rising, last year slightly over 8400 cases were diagnosed

  • It is most common in Caucasians, followed by Latinos, American Indians, and African American

 

Risk Reduction in Communities

Since the cause of TC is unknown, our efforts concentrate on reducing the risk of death from TC through self-examination and early detection. This is accomplished most easily by creating awareness among young men, parents, caretakers and communities of the need to encourage self-examination and follow through with a medical professional if something is found.

Presentations can be completed in less than one hour. They are intended for delivery to high school classes, work groups and other venues were testicular health discussions are appropriate.

 


Who Can Do This Training?

Programs are designed to provide useful and current information on TC, and can be presented by community leaders, teachers, parents, survivors, nurses, physicians, community health representatives, or anyone who desires to proactively help educate on risk reduction strategies related to TC. Programs can be presented in classrooms, informal, formal, or community group settings. 

 

Conducting Community Education
 

Presenters are encouraged to urge others to help spread the message through presentations, the use of resource materials included, and train the trainer meetings. If “train the trainer” programs are utilized, the trained trainers should be evaluated to be sure they have adequate and factually correct knowledge and that they know how to utilize the materials.

Presentations should allow time for discussion.

A pre / post test is available to presenters who wish to see how much people learned from the program.

Community Presentations- Provides local advocates and leaders with resources to inform young men and women about testicular cancer. Information includes:

  • Understanding risk — educating about family health history, symptoms, risk factors, and talking to health care providers.

  • Knowing what is normal — Everyone’s body is different. Knowing how one’s testicles look and feel, and reporting any changes to health care providers right away can catch the disease early and make a difference in treatment strategies and survival rates. Remember TC has a 95% survival rate when diagnosed and treated early.

  • Seeking Medical Advise — asking providers about risk factors and having clinical testicular examinations.

 

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Survivors Presentations- Many survivors are inspired to share their personal stories in order to encourage young men to take control of their own testicular health. Information includes:

  • Understanding risk — educating about family health history, symptoms, risk factors, and talking to health care providers.

  • Knowing what is normal — Everyone’s body is different. Knowing how one’s testicles look and feel, and reporting any changes to health care providers right away can catch the disease early and make a difference in treatment strategies and survival rates. Remember TC has a 95% survival rate when diagnosed and treated early.

  • Seeking Medical Advise — asking providers about risk factors and having clinical testicular examinations.

Health Care Provider Presentations- A training course designed to assist health care providers increase their knowledge of testicular cancer, be more aware of risk factors, and build their communication and outreach skills.

  • Helps provider groups screen for TC.

  • Contains information and materials needed to create awareness of the disease, encourage self-examination, and open dialogs with patients.

  • Help understand the unique concerns of young men when diagnosed with testicular cancer.

ConclusionsRisk reduction is everyone’s job. We can save many lives by encouraging self-examination and follow through behavior. This online presentation is available as a grassroots advocacy initiative from the Sean Kimerling Testicular Cancer Foundation.

 
 

Start Educating Your Community Today

If you are interested in using this program to speak to your community or would like to inquiry about having a survivor speak at your

school, organization or community, please contact us by CLICKING HERE