Cart 0

Letter from the president

aa17.jpg
 
"Thank you for your generous donation of Check'Em Shower Cards to our college health services. Testicular cancer and breast cancer information is prominently displayed together right outside of our Health Services offices, so students can help themselves and come in for more information."

- Carol Jacobson, RN, Anne Arundel Community College Health Services

 

Dear Friends and Supporters,

The Sean Kimerling Testicular Cancer Foundation's mission of raising awareness about testicular cancer through outreach to colleges, university and high schools for early detection, treatment and cure is reflected in nurse Jacobson's thank you above. By now you know that TC is up to 99% curable when diagnosed in its earliest stages and that men 15-40 are particularly vulnerable to this curable cancer.

Here are some other ways that we engaged people in 2017 to raise awareness about TC:

The "RUNNING OF THE BALLS" is growing and reaching thousands in New York and D.C.

 

  • SKTCF branched out to D.C., home of Georgetown University, Sean's Alma Mater. On September 9, 2017 we held the First Annual D.C./Georgetown Running of the Balls, with 100 runners organized by the D.C. Running Club, contact with many universities in the DC area and fantastic promotions and testicular cancer public service announcements from our Presenting Sponsors, Tribune Media TV station DC50 and popular radio station DC101.
  • Over 900 runners were registered for the 5th Annual NY "RUNNING OF THE BALLS" on June 18th, produced by NYCRuns. With NY's own Tribune Media station PIX11 as the Presenting Sponsor and extensive social media outreach, this event reached the very demographic that we need to educate.
  • We are grateful to Presenting Sponsors PIX11, DC50, DC101 and all of our sponsors including: The Mets, O-v-e-r-t-o-n-e Studios, Bencivenga and Associates, Street-Works Studio, Kimerling & Wisdom, LLC, Len and Kathy Gallo, Wolaco Athletic Wear, AmerisourceBergen, the Kimerling Family, AJF Financial Services, Fromonda and Wristband Creation.
  • SKTCF raised over $50,000 from these races for our work in the coming year.


EDUCATION through speaking in schools and contacting high schools, colleges and universities, distributing Check'Em Shower Cards to over 75 institutions and their health centers.

SKTCF is focusing on building relationships with high school and college health centers with the goal of distributing 7500 Check'Em Shower Cards by the end of 2018. With your help, we provide these free to these institutions.

TYLER AUSTIN, a promising young NY Yankee and TC Survivor, has joined forces with SKTCF to be a spokesperson for the important message about awareness and early detection of TC. Watch for his cleats with SKTCF logo to be auctioned off soon!

CONTINUED TO BUILD OUR SOCIAL MEDIA CAMPAIGN:

www.THEBALLREPORT.com, our website about balls, crafted to attract those young men most at risk, which reaches over a quarter of a million people each year with an irreverent awareness message that engages our target demographic and refers them back to our website for more info on TC.

Natalie Shivdat, social media coordinator,and Jeff Oppenheim, social media advisor, continued to build our Facebook and Twitter presence while focusing on growing SKTCF YouTube Channel to over 2000 subscribers with almost 4 million combined views of our videos.

Many thanks to our Board, the Run Committee, all of our sponsors, Rosemary Shameer and each and every one of you for your generous support. Whether you are old friends or new, each of you gives us hope that we can continue to work together towards a time when no man need die of testicular cancer.

YOUR PART: As we look forward to 2018, with increased outreach and visibility for the TC Awareness message, we welcome your ideas for expanding our program in the new year.

We ask you once again to dig deep and contribute generously so that together we continue to work towards a time when young men routinely check their testicles. Your commitment and generous donations enable us to spread the word - Check 'em if You Got 'em! - for Awareness IS the Cure.

To make a donation, Click Here. Ask your employer about a matching gifts program and you double the impact of your gift.

All contributions are fully tax deductible. Sean Kimerling Testicular Cancer Foundation is a registered 501(c)(3) public charity.

We remain grateful to you for partnering with us in this important cause.


Sincerely,

Noah Kimerling
President & CEO

Sean Kimerling Testicular Cancer Foundation The Sean Kimerling Testicular Cancer Foundation is a registered 501(c)(3) charity. Your contribution is tax-deductible to the extent allowed by law.

 

 
 
aa.png

What is testicular cancer?

Testicular cancer is a disease in which cancer develops in one or both of a man's testicles. While rare, it is the most common form of cancer in men between the ages of 15 and 40. Each year, approximately 7,000 to 8,000 new cases of testicular cancer are diagnosed in the U.S., and approximately 400 men die.

Cancer develops when cells begin to grow out of control. As these abnormal cells rapidly grow and develop, they invade and destroy healthy tissues and organs in the body.

Young men most at risk.
Testicular cancer most often affects men between the ages of 15 and 40. However, men of any age, including infants and the elderly can develop testicular cancer.

A growing problem.
The incidence (the number of new cases diagnosed per year) of testicular cancer in white men in the U.S. has doubled over the last two decades. The cause of the increase is not known.

Highly treatable, especially when caught early.
Testicular cancer is one of the most curable forms of cancer. The overall 5-year survival rate is approximately 95%. However, the complexity of treating the disease greatly increases and the survival rate declines as the disease progresses. Unfortunately, half of all men diagnosed with testicular cancer do not seek medical attention until after the cancer has spread to other areas of the body.

View and download National Cancer Institute Fact Sheet
Seer Data TC


What are the Risk Factors?

Most cases of testicular cancer occur in young (15-40), white, men. However, it's important to remember that any man, regardless of age or race, can develop testicular cancer.

Research has not shown a connection between testicular cancer and any particular habits, activities, or lifestyles. Other factors that are associated with a higher risk of testicular cancer include:

Race.
White men are approximately five times as likely as African-American men and twice as likely as Asian-American men to develop testicular cancer. Native American and Hispanic men have a greater risk than African-American men, but lower than white men.

Undescended or Partially Descended Testicle (cryptorchidism).
Men who have an undescended or partially descended testicle have a risk of developing testicular cancer, even if surgery was performed to remove the testicle or bring it down into the scrotum. About 14% of cases of testicular cancer occur in men with a history of cryptorchidism.

Abnormal testicular development.
Men whose testicles did not develop normally are at increased risk.

Klinefelter's syndrome.
Men with Klinefelter's syndrome (a sex chromosome disorder that may be characterized by low levels of male hormones, sterility, breast enlargement, and small testes) are at greater risk of developing testicular cancer.

Family History.
Having a father or brother with testicular cancer increases your risk for developing the disease. Having small testicles or testicles that are not shaped correctly may increase your chances for this form of cancer.

TC.jpg

Self Exam

The best time to perform the self-exam is during or immediately after a warm shower or bath since the warm water relaxes the skin on the scrotum. Your fingers will more easily glide over soapy skin, making it easier to concentrate on the texture underneath and increasing the likelihood that you will feel any lumps or nodules on your testicles.

This video will clearly demonstrate the exact procedure:

How is testicular cancer diagnosed?
Most testicular cancers are found by men themselves. Also, doctors should examine the testicles during routine physical exams. Between regular checkups, if a man notices anything unusual about his testicles, he should talk with his doctor.

Download the Self Exam Poster

Symptoms
The earliest symptom of testicular cancer is, most often, pain, swelling, or hardness in the testis, or some combination of these symptoms. Less often, the first symptom a patient will notice is a small, painless lump on the testicle. A man with testicular cancer might also feel heaviness in the scrotum, an ache in the lower abdomen or groin area, an accumulation of blood or fluid in the scrotum, or a change in the way a testicle feels. More rarely, there is tenderness in the man's breast area usually caused by high levels of a hormone called human chronic gonadotropin (HCG). If the cancer has spread, symptoms may include severe, unrelenting back pain, shortness of breath, or hemoptysis (coughing up blood).

Often, a person with testicular cancer will not feel sick. In fact, there may not be any warning signs present. But remember, only a doctor can make a positive diagnosis of cancer.

Most testicular cancers are found by men themselves. Also, doctors should examine the testicles during routine physical exams. Between regular checkups, if a man notices anything unusual about his testicles, he should talk with his doctor.

The Importance of Self-Examination
The vast majority of testicular tumors are discovered by men themselves, either by accident or by performing the self-examination procedure. In fact, one research report found that only 4% of all testicular tumors are discovered by physicians, usually when they are performing an exam for other reasons. As a result, regular self-examination is essential.

The Exam
The testicular self-examination, or TSE, is a quick, simple, painless, exam that men can perform on themselves in the privacy of their own home. All men should perform the exam once a month. The exam takes only about three minutes to properly perform. By performing it regularly, you will become familiar with your anatomy and better able to recognize changes.

The best time to perform the TSE is during or immediately after a warm shower or bath. The warm water relaxes the skin on the scrotum, making it easier to perform the TSE. Also, your fingers will more easily glide over soapy skin, making it easier to concentrate on the texture underneath and increasing the likelihood that you will feel any lumps or nodules on your testicles.

Performing the Exam

  • Gently examine each testicle one at a time with both hands.
  • Place your index and middle fingers under the testicle and your thumbs on top.
  • Gently roll the testicle between your thumbs and fingers.
  • Feel for any small, hard lumps on the testicle.
  • Repeat the process with the other testicle.

Look and feel for any hard lumps or nodules (smooth rounded masses) or any change in the size, shape, or consistency of the testes. You should not feel any pain when performing the TSE. It is normal for one testicle to be a little larger than the other, and for one testicle to hang down a little lower. The testicles should be smooth and firm to the touch. You should be aware that each normal testis has an epididymis, which appears as a small "bump" on the upper or middle outer side of the testis. Normal testicles also contain blood vessels, supporting tissues, and tubes that conduct sperm. Some men may confuse these with cancer. If you have any doubts, ask your doctor. Sometimes, the testicle can be enlarged because fluid has collected around it. This is called a hydrocele. Other times, the veins in the testicle can dilate and cause enlargement and lumpiness around the testicle. This is called a varicocele. To be sure you have one of these conditions and not a tumor, you need to have a doctor examine you.

What if I find a lump?
If you find a lump on your testicle, see a doctor immediately. The lump may not be cancer, but if it is, the chances are very good that it can be treated. Testicular cancer has a 95% survival rate, but it is extremely important to catch the cancer early. If you have any concerns about what you find during self-examination, see your doctor. Do not dismiss your concern or hope it will go away. Many men let fear or embarrassment keep them from seeking medical help. Concerns about masculinity or sexuality often present significant barriers for men faced with the need for medical attention. But testicular tumors are some of the fastest growing of all human cancers. The longer you wait to seek help, the worse your situation may be when you finally see a doctor. There is nothing to be embarrassed about when it comes to cancer. See your doctor as soon as possible.

SELF-EXAM.JPG
new-events.png
Most testicular cancers are found by men themselves. Also, doctors should examine the testicles during routine physical exams. Between regular checkups, if a man notices anything u
Raising awareness of testicular cancer and the importance of early diagnosis and treatment.
Every hour of every day one man in the United States is diagnosed with testicular cancer. It is not one of the cancers you hear people talking about. Why is that? It needs to be discussed, as men are needlessly dying from a disease that's up to 99% curable when found early.
Most testicular cancers are found by men themselves. Also, doctors should examine the testicles during routine physical exams. Between regular checkups, if a man notices anything unusual about his testicles, he should talk with his doctor.
Most testicular cancers are found by men themselves. Also, doctors should examine the testicles during routine physical exams. Between regular checkups, if a man notices anything u
Most testicular cancers are found by men themselves. Also, doctors should examine the testicles during routine physical exams. Between regular checkups, if a man notices anything u
Most testicular cancers are found by men themselves. Also, doctors should examine the testicles during routine physical exams. Between regular checkups, if a man notices anything u
media.png
showercard.jpg

Shower Card/awareness materials

SKTCF is proud to collaborate with UnitedHealthcare, the largest single health carrier in the United States, to fight testicular cancer. A recognized leader in the health and well-being industry, UnitedHealthcare’s support enables SKTCF to spread the message on the importance of early detection and self-examination without asking donations to defray the cost of printing.

SKTCF appreciates the support of individuals and organizations in the fight against TC. The foundation requests donations for shipping and handling costs.

SKTCF recognizes there are times where financial resources are not available. To help further our mission of raising public awareness about testicular cancer and the importance of self-examination requests will be shipped. Please click here to email us.

Cards can be ordered in quantities of 20/100 or multiples of each quantity.

Diagnosis Poster
Graphic representation of incidence of TC in United States
Download here

Facts and Figures Race
Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) Fact Sheets/Cancer of the Testis
Download here

Facts and Figures Age
Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) Fact Sheets/Cancer of the Testis
Download here

The best time to perform the self-exam is during or immediately after a warm shower or bath since the warm water relaxes the skin on the scrotum. Your fingers will more easily glide over soapy skin, making it easier to concentrate on the texture underneath and increasing the likelihood that you will feel any lumps or nodules on your testicles.

Self Exam Brochure

Whether attempting to reduce your risk or educate a friend or loved one, this easy to understand brochure, created pro-bono as a public service by Barker/DZP, provides basic information about testicular cancer including risk factors, symptoms, and an easy to understand 4-step instructional guide to performing a TSE.

Click Here to Download

Self Exam Poster

Every healthcare or health service provider’s office, high school or college gym, and health club should post this 4-step poster, created pro-bono as a public service by Barker/DZP, featuring step-by-step instructions to performing a TSE.

Click Here to Download

Check Em Poster

Healthcare or health service provider’s offices, high school orcollege gyms, and health clubs can display this poster communicating animportant reminder of testicular exams, created pro-bono as a public service by Barker/DZP.

Click Here to Download

showercard.jpg
 
austin.png

tyler austin

Tyler Austin, Yankee first baseman and testicular cancer survivor, is beginning to speak out about testicular cancer. In February of this year, this personable young man spoke to a crowd of almost 1000 people in Connecticut and was very well received. Tyler was diagnosed with TC at 17 years of age, had surgery to remove the tumor and is now in good health. He did not need chemotherapy because he found his tumor early and it did not spread to other parts of his body. Tyler knows first hand that with early detection Testicular Cancer is curable.

Tyler Austin, now 25, was selected by the NY Yankees in the 2010 MLB draft. He was a highly regarded prospect for bringing young talent to the Yankees. However, due to a number of injuries over the years, it was 2016 before he was brought to the majors. However, what a debut! On August 13, 2016 in his first at bat, Tyler hit a two run homer. Unfortunately, another injury sidelined him for 6 weeks this season. However, we look forward to Tyler Austin's return to Yankee Stadium in the 2017 season. And the Sean Kimerling Testicular Cancer Foundation is thrilled to have Tyler join us in the fight for Testicular Cancer Awareness - for early detection of TC is indeed the cure.

Tyler was interviewed in the video above by Marc Topkin, award winning sports reporter for the Tampa Bay Times and lifelong friend of Sean Kimerling and the Kimerling family.

thomas.jpg

thomas cantley

My name is Thomas Cantley and over the past 2 years I have focused my efforts on pushing a giant inflatable testicle across 2 countries and over 8,000 miles to raise awareness for a growing disease in young men. Yes, you heard that right, a giant NUT. For those of you who don't know me, I am also known as Mr. Ballsy and am a 5 years out stage 3 Testicular Cancer survivor. My efforts in this amazing journey has made me recognized globally and quoted as one of the most outspoken voices in Testicular Cancer awareness in the world. I have gained hundreds of hours of media coverage for this worthy cause. But, being ballsy is more than just cancer, it's a lifestyle.

My story did not start with cancer. I had a rough past (starting from childhood and into adulthood) that lead me down the darkest of alleys. I was well known professionally and socially in the New York City scene which brought it's own troubles. Cancer woke me the f*** up and saved my life.

With everything I have faced in my life, I have managed to turn all of my negatives into a positive. And what I'm most proud of, is helping others by using my life as a tool to teach people what not to do. I now travel the world entertaining, educating, and inspiring. My goal is to bring out that inner ballsy in everyone in all walks of life and in all parts of the world.

I currently am in post production with my feature film mr ballsy.

colin.jpg

colin ferro

Once cancer comes into your family and you have to face it alongside a loved one, your perspective in life tends to change—at least I know it did for me when my brother, Michael, was diagnosed with testicular cancer. At the time of Michael’s diagnosis, we were both still in college at Regis University; he was a senior and I was a junior. I found myself at school just going through the motions; the faculty and my classmates were very supportive, but as time went on, I found my priorities changing. I was no longer worrying about what grade I got on that advertising project. Instead I was wondering, is Michael going to want to get outside today?

Michael and I have been best friends since I was born, but after his diagnosis and procedures were behind him, he started falling into an emotional hole and it became harder and harder to pull him out of it. All I kept thinking was, how can I help? Can I help at all? I couldn’t pay for appointments, surgeries, treatments, and medications; my parents were taking care of that financial burden. But I could help by trying to make Michael smile, if only for a moment a day, so that’s what I did. I started working more bartending and serving shifts at Red Robin so I could pay for Michael and me to go to a movie or sporting event, or sometimes just buy a six-pack of beer to enjoy at home while I did ridiculous things to get that brief smile.

Michael is doing well today, with a successful job and a positive outlook on where he is in life. Why do I share this story? Without having gone through these experiences with Michael, I would not be where I am today. To read more of Colin's story click here

 
survivor.jpg